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01363 898 964

Hare House, Sandford, EX17 4ED

© New British Design 2020

Architecture and Furniture Design | Exeter, Devon

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Off-grid Kudhva eco camping pod by award winning architect New British Design

Kudhva

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'The word 'Kudhva' comes from the Cornish for 'hideout' and was the touchstone for developing the brief for these secluded retreats. The cabins are intended to offer a unique perspective on the Cornish landscape from their elevated position amongst the trees.' 

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CLIENT KUDHVA

LOCATION  CORNWALL

STATUS ONGOING

SECTOR  OFF GRID

CONTRACT £N/A 

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Kudhva, meaning hideout in Cornish, are a series of prototype wilderness cabins situated in a disused slate quarry on the north coast of Cornwall. The Kudhva are a physical manifestation of the client’s approach to natural living.

 

The cabins are intended to be the first phase of a wider masterplan for the site offering the public the chance to experience temporary small-scale experimental architecture. Ben Huggins’ worked with client and long-term collaborator Louise Middleton on the project brief before developing the first four prototype cabins.

 

The word ‘Kudhva’ comes from the Cornish for ‘hideout’ and was the touchstone for developing the brief for these secluded retreats. The cabins are intended to offer a unique perspective on the Cornish landscape from their elevated position amongst the trees.

 

Built by boat builder turned furniture maker Toby Sharp with a small team of master craftsmen in a nearby workshop, the cabins were then assembled and transported to site before being craned onto their cradle bases. The cabins are constructed from structural, insulated paged-pine panels with an EDPM rubber membrane covering. A larch-slatted skin covers the cabin that is elevated above the ground on turned pine poles. Galvanised steel is used for all railings, ladders, frame jointing and ground connections, providing both ease of assembly and extended life span of all timber elements.

 

The site also hosts a temporary scaffolding reception building offering a canteen as well as toilets and showers.

‘For as long as I can remember, the fascination with an elevated aspect has drawn me to certain objects from diving boards to the umpire’s chair. The familiar unfamiliarity of seeing an everyday scene or object from a strange position is the genesis of making it interesting again. much of the spring of 2016 was taken up traversing the site with a tall stepladder in an effort to find a view through and above the trees.’

Ben Huggins, Project Architect

Gallery

 

Press